I had fun experimenting with adding texture to the buildings by scanning in color-pencil rubbings of different surfaces from around my apartment.  Illustration for the Pittsburgh Promise.  

The article that I created this illustration for is about Isamu Noguchi’s not-as-well-known father, Yone Noguchi (1875-1947), who was a poet and writer who lived in the US for some time.  As the article states, “Yone deals with the intense way Japan is particularly exoticized as whites aimed to grow closer to him…”  I tried to depict this by showing Yone looking at himself in a mirror being looked at by a 19th century white bohemian.  I also tried to reference the style of Japanese prints (ukiyo-e), which were coming into vogue during that time in the west.  This illustration will be in the upcoming issue of Hyphen Magazine.  

The article that I created this illustration for is about Isamu Noguchi’s not-as-well-known father, Yone Noguchi (1875-1947), who was a poet and writer who lived in the US for some time.  As the article states, “Yone deals with the intense way Japan is particularly exoticized as whites aimed to grow closer to him…”  I tried to depict this by showing Yone looking at himself in a mirror being looked at by a 19th century white bohemian.  I also tried to reference the style of Japanese prints (ukiyo-e), which were coming into vogue during that time in the west.  This illustration will be in the upcoming issue of Hyphen Magazine.  

(Source: yutakahoulette.com)

Editorial illustration for Orion magazine. The article that I created the illustration for is written by J.B. MacKinnon and is about how harvesting edible plants (in this case Wapato tubers), helps propagate them.

Editorial illustration for Orion magazine. The article that I created the illustration for is written by J.B. MacKinnon and is about how harvesting edible plants (in this case Wapato tubers), helps propagate them.

(Source: yutakahoulette.com)

This is a recent editorial illustration for The Pittsburgh Promise on the increasing diversity in public schools in Pittsburgh.

"How much water do clouds hold?" is one of the questions in next month’s Smithsonian Magazine’s Q & A section that I got to illustrate.  I love how the intersection of science and art can often lead to surreal visual ideas like this.  It was also fun to flex my design muscle and incorporate the Q into the composition.    

"How much water do clouds hold?" is one of the questions in next month’s Smithsonian Magazine’s Q & A section that I got to illustrate.  I love how the intersection of science and art can often lead to surreal visual ideas like this.  It was also fun to flex my design muscle and incorporate the Q into the composition.    

I’ve recently had a few opportunities to try to fit visual ideas onto the small canvases that are required for logo design.  At times, the reductive process felt a bit like a contortion act, but I was pretty happy with how this turned out and am happy to be making a logo for a cool company.  Zettatech is an after school arts and sciences program for kids in the Bay Area.  The kids get to  make solar power Lego cars among other neat projects.          

I’ve recently had a few opportunities to try to fit visual ideas onto the small canvases that are required for logo design.  At times, the reductive process felt a bit like a contortion act, but I was pretty happy with how this turned out and am happy to be making a logo for a cool company.  Zettatech is an after school arts and sciences program for kids in the Bay Area.  The kids get to  make solar power Lego cars among other neat projects.          

This is an attempt to try to “illuminate” the meaning of a Japanese kanji character in the style of old European illuminated manuscripts.  I referenced aspects of traditional Japanese and European decorative elements and of course used some “gold”.  For the last half year or so I have been studying kanji using Noriko Kuosawa Williams’ awesome book, The Key To Kanji, which breaks down each of the 1100 characters into their etymological parts (which really helps me remember them).  These parts are basically symbols and the meaning of the characters are produced by the sum of the parts, some of which are pretty surreal and poetic.  The character that I illustrated, means to flourish, or prosper, but can be combined with other characters to mean nutrition as well as vanity.  The top of the character are flames and the bottom is a tree.  I was excited to combine my study of Japanese with illustration and I hope to try my hand at “illuminating” a few more.              

(Source: yutakahoulette.com)

The title for this image, “stoplight roses”, was lifted from a Nick Lowe song I really like, off of his album The Old Magic.  I guess the phrase burrowed itself deep enough into my head that when I walked by the flower shop I used as a reference for the drawing long after hearing the tune, it reminded me of the lyrics and got me itching to make this illustration.  Here is a cool video of Nick Lowe performing the song.

(Source: yutakahoulette.com)

Kamon, or Japanese crests, have always intrigued me with their compact and elegant designs.  When I was recently asked to create a simple, black and white logo and typeface for a text editing company called Mietz Edits (who occasionally deal with Japanese clients), I thought that I might be able to draw some inspiration from these old crests.  The typeface that I ended up creating was directly inspired by a crest depicting folded paper.  Maybe, long ago this crest belonged to a family of paper-makers or poets or bureaucrats…  Since Mietz Edits deals with documents and paper, I thought it would be appropriate to reference the folded paper in the typeface.  As for the logo, they wanted it to be a cat and so I chose to represent it with origami.  Another idea for representing the cat, (which didn’t make the cut) was to have it comprised of editing symbols.  I had a lot of fun conceptualizing this project.    

(Source: yutakahoulette.com)

In this little series I tried to combine two things about downtown SF that made a strong first impression on me - the beautiful architecture and the many homeless people.

(Source: yutakahoulette.com)

It was fun to take various details from the buildings that I see around (the Bay Area) and mix them into a new building.    

I was recently asked by the editors of meatpaper magazine to create an illustration to accompany a story about the gory and dramatic history of whale hunting.  The concept for the image came from reading that oil for lamps used to primarily come from whale fat.  

I was recently asked by the editors of meatpaper magazine to create an illustration to accompany a story about the gory and dramatic history of whale hunting.  The concept for the image came from reading that oil for lamps used to primarily come from whale fat.  

This is an editorial illustration from a while back for the East Bay Express about the staggering amounts of medical waste that is generated in hospitals.  The google image searches for reference photos were pretty gross and depressing but I have to say that drawing bunches and tangles of flotsam is quiet fun.   

This is an editorial illustration from a while back for the East Bay Express about the staggering amounts of medical waste that is generated in hospitals.  The google image searches for reference photos were pretty gross and depressing but I have to say that drawing bunches and tangles of flotsam is quiet fun.   

Thanks to my friends at Baltimore Print Studios for teaching me all about halftones.  These will be printed this fall for Ganga Skateboard using five colors, one of which will be silver.

(Source: yutakahoulette.com)

hello baltimoreans and beyond. if you like our town’s fine row houses and want to see a t-shirt printed of a drawing i made of some, please vote for this design. the drawing is based on actual row houses - some from calvert near chase and some from charles near the charles theater. thanks!

hello baltimoreans and beyond. if you like our town’s fine row houses and want to see a t-shirt printed of a drawing i made of some, please vote for this design. the drawing is based on actual row houses - some from calvert near chase and some from charles near the charles theater. thanks!